Latest Research on Sandy Soil: Dec – 2019

Preferential flow mechanism in a water repellent sandy soil

Dry water repellent soils are difficult to wet, forcing water and solutes to flow via preferential paths through the unsaturated zone. A tracer field experiment was wont to investigate the mechanism of preferential flow and transport during a water repellent sandy soil. Water and solutes are distributed by lateral flow within the, relatively wet, thin humose topsoil toward preferential flow paths below this zone. This flow within the upper layer, which is of major importance within the spatial distribution of water and solutes in field soils, is usually not considered, and is introduced here as “distribution flow.” The preferential flow paths are separated by dry soil bodies, which are highly persistent thanks to their extremely water repellent character and their low hydraulic conductivity. [1]

How water moves in a water repellent sandy soil: 1. Potential and actual water repellency

Water repellency is a crucial property of the many soils. It causes rainwater to penetrate into the soil as preferential flow paths, and solutes can reach the groundwater sooner than within the case of a homogeneous wetting. Water repellency depends on several factors which are principally associated with the characteristics of the organic matter of the soil. A distinction between “potential” and “actual” water repellency and therefore the assessment of the “critical soil water content” are introduced and highlighted during this paper. [2]

Organic Amendment Effects on Physical and Chemical Properties of a Sandy Soil

Effects of repeated applications of sewage-sludge compost on soil properties haven’t been sufficiently evaluated with field trials. Field studies were established on an Evesboro loamy sand soil (mesic, coated Typic Quartzipsamment, 97% sand) to match the consequences of sewage-sludge compost, beef manure, and fertilizer amendments on soil properties. The study site had been fallow for 26 yr and will have provided a positive response to the added organic matter. Compost application rates were supported the idea that material would be applied either just one occasion or annually. Application rates ranged from people who were too low to provide the entire N requirement of a crop (e.g., 33 Mg ha−1) to excessively high rates that might produce maximum soil benefits from the added organic matter (e.g., 268 Mg ha−1). [3]

Improving water retention capacity of an aeolian sandy soil with feldspathic sandstone

The Mu Us sandy land in China’s Shaanxi Province faces a critical water shortage, with its aeolian sandy soil endangering the regional eco-environment. Here we investigated the consequences of feldspathic sandstone on water retention in an aeolian sandy soil from the Mu Us sandy land. Feldspathic sandstone and aeolian sandy soil samples were mixed at different mass ratios of 0:1 (control), 1:5 (T1), 1:2 (T2), and 1:1 (T3). Soil-water characteristic curves were determined over low- to medium-suction (1–1000 kPa) and high-suction (1000–140 000 kPa) ranges, by centrifuge and water vapour equilibrium methods, respectively. [4]

Relationship between the Absorption Behavior of Iron and Silicon by Plant and the Macronutrients Affected by Some Sandy Soil Additives

Aims: A field experiment was administered to review the connection between the plant content of iron (Fe) and/or silicon (Si) and therefore the macronutrients under the sandy soil conditions in presence of soil additives different in their effect on the nutrient’ availability.

Place and Duration of Study: A field experiment for 2 successive seasons (Sesame in summer season 2015 and wheat in winter season 2016) in sandy soil of the Ismailia Agricultural Research Station – Egypt.

Methodology: Separate single rates of 1190.48 kg/ha for rice straw, cellulose, silica were mixed with the soil surface before cultivation then covered with a skinny layer of soil. Sesame seeds and/or wheat grains were hand sown and planted as recommended. At harvest, the seeds and grains were analyzed for N, P, K, Si and Fe, also because the soil available N, P, K after harvesting each crop. [5]

Reference

[1] Ritsema, C.J., Dekker, L.W., Hendrickx, J.M.H. and Hamminga, W., 1993. Preferential flow mechanism in a water repellent sandy soil. Water Resources Research, 29(7), (Web Link)

[2] Dekker, L.W. and Ritsema, C.J., 1994. How water moves in a water repellent sandy soil: 1. Potential and actual water repellency. Water Resources Research, 30(9), (Web Link)

[3] Tester, C.F., 1990. Organic amendment effects on physical and chemical properties of a sandy soil. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 54(3), (Web Link)

[4] Improving water retention capacity of an aeolian sandy soil with feldspathic sandstone
Lu Zhang & Jichang Han
Scientific Reports volume 9, (Web Link)

[5] T. Rashad, R. (2017) “Relationship between the Absorption Behavior of Iron and Silicon by Plant and the Macronutrients Affected by Some Sandy Soil Additives”, Asian Journal of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 1(3), (Web Link)

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