Latest Research on Organic Fertilizer: Feb – 2020

Effect of different application rates of organic fertilizer on soil enzyme activity and microbial population

After cultivating 24 crops of vegetables for 3 consecutive years during a greenhouse, the consequences of various application rates of compost (Rate 1, 270 kg N ha−1 y−1; Rate 2, 540 kg N ha−1 y−1; Rate 3, 810 kg N ha−1 y−1; Rate 4, 1,080 kg N ha−1 y−1) were compared with the consequences of chemical fertilizer (CF) and no application of fertilizer treatments (CK) for a few selected soil chemical properties, microbial populations and soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, cellulase, β-glucosidase, protease, urease, arysulphatase, and acid and alkaline phosphatases). The results show that the pH, electrical conductivity, concentrations of total nitrogen (N) and therefore the organic matter received from compost treatment were generally above those received through CF treatment. The soil microbial biomass, populations of bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes, also as soil enzyme activities increased significantly within the compost-treated soils compared with the CF-treated soil. In most instances, no significant increase was observed within the enzymatic activities studied for compost applications above a Rate 2 treatment. [1]

Vermicomposting: Recycling Wastes into Valuable Organic Fertilizer. Global Theme on Agroecosystems Report no. 8

The large quantity of organic waste, nearly 700 million t yr-1, generated in India is either burned or land filled posing a drag of safe disposal. To mitigate this problem all the waste are often converted into highly valuable nutrient-rich compost in an environment friendly manner. Vermicomposting is one among the simplest methods of composting any quite organic matter, which could provide a ‘win-win’ solution to tackle the matter of safe disposal of waste and also provide most needed plant nutrients for sustainable productivity.Vermicompost improves growth, quality and yield of various field crops, flower and fruit crops. Vermicomposting contributes to recycling of nitrogen and augments soil physico-chemical also as biological properties. Microbial biodiversity was checked and better diversity was recorded within the partially decomposed organic material for the vermicompost than within the vermicompost. all types of organic material are often used for vermicomposting however, Gliricidia, tobacco leaves and chicken droppings aren’t suitable for earthworm multiplication but are often composted with earthworms. [2]

Soil micronutrient availability to crops as affected by long-term inorganic and organic fertilizer applications

Micronutrient status in soils and crops are often suffering from different fertilization practices during a long-term field experiment. This paper investigated the consequences of various fertilization treatments on total and DTPA-extractable micronutrients in soils and micronutrients in crops after 16 year fertilization experiments in Fengqiu County, Henan Province, China. The treatments of the long-term experiment included combinations of varied rates of N, P and K additionally to 2 rates of organic (OF) treatments. Winter wheat and summer maize were planted annually. Soil macro- and micronutrients along side pH and organic matter (OM) were analyzed. Grains and above ground parts of both crops within the final year were harvested and analyzed for Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn. The results showed that soil Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn concentrations didn’t change among the various treatments to a big level, apart from a small decrease of soil Zn within the CK (no fertilizer application) compared to the OF treatment. The DTPA-extractable soil Zn, Fe and Mn concentrations increased from 0.41 to 1.08 mg kg−1, from 10.3 to 17.7 mg kg−1, and from 9.7 to 11.8 mg kg−1, respectively, with increasing soil OM content, thus showing the importance of soil OM in micronutrient availability for crops. [3]

Bio-organic fertilizer with reduced rates of chemical fertilization improves soil fertility and enhances tomato yield and quality

The extensive use of chemical fertilizers poses serious collateral problems like environmental pollution, pest resistance development and food safety decline. Researches focused on applying plant-beneficial microorganisms to partially replace chemical fertilizer use is increasing thanks to the need of sustainable agriculture development. Thus to research the likelihood of a plant-beneficial Trichoderma strain and its bio-organic fertilizer product in saving chemical fertilizer application and in improving crop quality, a field trial and continuous pot experiments were administered with tomato. Four treatments were set up: a reduced application of chemical fertilizer (75% of the traditional application) plus Trichoderma-enriched bio-organic fertilizer (BF), organic (OF) or Trichoderma spore suspension (SS), with using the 100% rate of the traditional chemical fertilizer because the control (CF). [4]

Variation in Soil Chemical and Microbiological Properties as a Result of Yearly Amendment with Organic Fertilizer

Millions of organic fertilizers are produced annually everywhere the planet . Substantial quantities of those were crop residues and therefore the remaining being animal waste based. Meanwhile maintaining and improving soil fertility within the tropic is important for increasing food production for rapidly expanding the population. This project work, therefore, investigated the variation in soil chemical and microbiological properties as a results of yearly amendment with compost. The experimental site was the Organic Agricultural Farm located within the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta. Soil samples were collected between 0 – 15 cm depth using soil auger and therefore the samples were analyzed for the subsequent soil parameters; total viable counts, total fungal counts, microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, percentage organic carbon, microarthropod counts and earthworm counts. [5]

Reference

[1] Chang, E.H., Chung, R.S. and Tsai, Y.H., 2007. Effect of different application rates of organic fertilizer on soil enzyme activity and microbial population. Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 53(2), (Web Link)

[2] Nagavallemma, K.P., Wani, S.P., Lacroix, S., Padmaja, V.V., Vineela, C., Rao, M.B. and Sahrawat, K.L., 2004. Vermicomposting: Recycling wastes into valuable organic fertilizer. Global Theme on Agroecosystems Report no. 8. (Web Link)

[3] Li, B.Y., Zhou, D.M., Cang, L., Zhang, H.L., Fan, X.H. and Qin, S.W., 2007. Soil micronutrient availability to crops as affected by long-term inorganic and organic fertilizer applications. Soil and Tillage Research, 96(1-2), (Web Link)

[4] Bio-organic fertilizer with reduced rates of chemical fertilization improves soil fertility and enhances tomato yield and quality
Lin Ye, Xia Zhao, Encai Bao, Jianshe Li, Zhirong Zou & Kai Cao
Scientific Reports volume 10, (Web Link)

[5] A. Babalola, O., O. Adigun, M. and O. Abiola, I. (2018) “Variation in Soil Chemical and Microbiological Properties as a Result of Yearly Amendment with Organic Fertilizer”, Asian Soil Research Journal, 1(1), (Web Link)

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