Latest Research on Nutritional Supplements : July – 2020

Consumption of nutritional supplements among adolescents: usage and perceived benefits

The aim of the study was to obtain rich qualitative data about the type of nutritional supplements and drinks consumed by adolescents, and the reasons for their consumption, with particular emphasis on the perceived benefits of nutritional supplementation. Semi-structured focus group interviews (n = 16) were conducted among 78 adolescents aged 11–18 years from a co-educational government high school. Participants reported consuming sports drinks, vitamin and mineral supplements, energy drinks, herbal supplements, guarana, creatine, high protein milk supplements, and coenzyme Q10. Reasons for supplement use included perceived short-term health benefits, prevention of illness, improved immunity, parental supply of supplements, taste, energy boost, better sports performance and to rectify a poor diet. [1]

A randomised controlled trial evaluating the use of enteral nutritional supplements postoperatively in malnourished surgical patients

BACKGROUND Patients who undergo surgery are at risk of malnutrition due to periods of starvation, the stress of surgery, and subsequent increase in metabolic rate. There are limited data on nutritional outcome of surgical patients.

AIMS To investigate changes in nutritional status and the influence of oral supplements on nutritional status, morbidity, and quality of life in postoperative surgical patients.

METHODS Entry was determined by the presence of malnutrition, as defined by a body mass index (BMI) ⩽20 kg/m2, anthropometric measurements ⩽15th percentile on admission, or initiation of oral diet postoperatively and/or a weight loss of 5% or more during the operative period. We studied 101 patients: 52 were randomised to the treatment group (TG) and prescribed a 1.5 kcal/ml nutritional supplement; 49 patients were randomised to the control group (CG) and continued with routine nutritional management. Nutritional status was assessed by weight, anthropometry, and grip strength, with measurements taken at two weekly intervals for 10 weeks. Complications, namely wound infection, chest infection, and antibiotic use were documented. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed using the UK SF-36 questionnaire. [2]

Chemical Properties and Toxicity of Chromium(III) Nutritional Supplements

The status of Cr(III) as an essential micronutrient for humans is currently under question. No functional Cr(III)-containing biomolecules have been definitively described as yet, and accumulated experience in the use of Cr(III) nutritional supplements (such as [Cr(pic)3], where pic = 2-pyridinecarboxylato) has shown no measurable benefits for nondiabetic people. Although the use of large doses of Cr(III) supplements may lead to improvements in glucose metabolism for type 2 diabetics, there is a growing concern over the possible genotoxicity of these compounds, particularly of [Cr(pic)3]. The current perspective discusses chemical transformations of Cr(III) nutritional supplements in biological media, with implications for both beneficial and toxic actions of Cr(III) complexes, which are likely to arise from the same biochemical mechanisms, dependent on concentrations of the reactive species. [3]

Nutritional Quality of Food Supplements for Children from 6 to 59 Months Proposed to the Dietary Service of Regional Hospital of Daloa (Ivory Coast)

Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional quality of the infant flours offered to mothers received in the dietary service of the CHR of Daloa.

Introduction: Ivory Coast’s membership in Scaling up Nutrition (SUN) is a momentum in a collective effort to improve the nutrition and nutritional status of the population.

Method : For this purpose, analyses of biochemical compositions, in particular the levels of protein, fat and minerals in the proposed infant flours, were carried out.

Results: The formulations of the flours proposed have high nutritional values. The protein content of compound flours increases proportionally with the amount of soy incorporated. Indeed, for FC2 and FC3 formulations, these contents are 17.12 ± 0.19 g / 100 g (FC3) and 17.50 ± 0.56 g / 100 g (FC2) with a rate of incorporation of 25% soy. In addition, the FC1 flour formulation enriched with peanuts is low in protein with a value of 8.69 ± 0.11 g / 100 g. These flours also had mineral contents in accordance with WHO standards of calcium (> 125 mg / kg), iron (> 4 mg / kg) and zinc (> 0.8 mg / kg). In addition these formulations are highly digestible.

Conclusion: However, to use the proposed meal formulations as food for malnutrition, it would necessarily be necessary to supplement them with available local fruits and vegetables, rich in vitamins and minerals. [4 ]

Reference

[1]  O’Dea, J.A., 2003. Consumption of nutritional supplements among adolescents: usage and perceived benefits. Health education research, 18(1), pp.98-107.

[2] Beattie, A.H., Prach, A.T., Baxter, J.P. and Pennington, C.R., 2000. A randomised controlled trial evaluating the use of enteral nutritional supplements postoperatively in malnourished surgical patients. Gut, 46(6), pp.813-818.

[3] Levina, A. and Lay, P.A., 2008. Chemical properties and toxicity of chromium (III) nutritional supplements. Chemical research in toxicology, 21(3), pp.563-571.

[4] Levina, A. and Lay, P.A., 2008. Chemical properties and toxicity of chromium (III) nutritional supplements. Chemical research in toxicology, 21(3), pp.563-571.

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