Latest Research on Maize Production: Jan – 2020

The potential impacts of climate change on maize production in Africa and Latin America in 2055

The impacts of global climate change on agriculture may add significantly to the event challenges of ensuring food security and reducing poverty. We show the possible impacts on maize production in Africa and Latin America to 2055, using high-resolution methods to get characteristic daily weather data for driving an in depth simulation model of the maize crop. Although the results indicate an overall reduction of only 10% in maize production to 2055, like losses of $2 billion per annum , the mixture results hide enormous variability: areas are often identified where maize yields may change substantially. global climate change urgently must be assessed at the extent of the household, in order that poor and vulnerable people hooked in to agriculture are often appropriately targeted in research and development activities whose object is poverty alleviation. [1]

Alternate furrow irrigation for maize production in an arid area

A new irrigation method for maize production was designed and tested for yield and water use efficiency (WUE). A field experiment was conducted in an arid area, with seasonal rainfall of 80 mm, over 2 years (1997 and 1998). Irrigation was applied through furrows in three ways: alternate furrow irrigation (AFI), fixed furrow irrigation (FFI), and traditional furrow irrigation (CFI). AFI means one among the 2 neighboring furrows was alternately irrigated during consecutive watering. FFI means irrigation was fixed to at least one of the 2 neighboring furrows. CFI was the traditional way where every furrow was irrigated during each watering. Each irrigation method was further divided into three sub-treatments with different irrigation amounts: 45, 30 and 22.5 mm water at each application. [2]

Understanding production potentials and yield gaps in intensive maize production in China

Understanding yield potentials and exploitable gaps in current intensive maize (Zea mays L.) production is important so as to extend grain yields to satisfy future food requirements amid strong competition for limited resources. during this study, we used simulations with the Hybrid-Maize Model (http://www.hybridmaize.unl.edu/), highest recorded yields published within the literature, field experiments, and farm survey data to assess yield potentials and gaps in four maize agro-ecological regions of China. In 50 simulations of high-yield sites across China from 1990 to 2009, the yield potential averaged 16.5 Mg ha−1 for irrigated maize and 13.9 Mg ha−1 for rainfed maize, respectively. During an equivalent period, the very best recorded yield was 15.4 Mg ha−1, or 93% of the yield potential of irrigated maize. as compared , the typical farmer’s yield was 7.9 Mg ha−1 supported 5584 farms surveyed in 2007–2008. [3]

Global alterations in areas of suitability for maize production from climate change and using a mechanistic species distribution model (CLIMEX)

At the worldwide level, maize is that the third most vital crop on the idea of harvested area. Given its importance, an assessment of the variation in regional climatic suitability under global climate change is critical. CliMond 10′ data were wont to model the potential current and future climate distribution of maize at the worldwide level using the CLIMEX distribution model with climate data from two general circulation models, CSIRO-Mk3.0 and MIROC-H, assuming an A2 emissions scenario for 2050 and 2100. The change in area under future climate was analysed at continental level and for major maize-producing countries of the planet . Regions between the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn indicate the very best loss of climatic suitability, contrary to poleward regions that exhibit a rise of suitability. South America shows the very best loss of climatic suitability, followed by Africa and Oceania. [4]

Identification of Farmer’s Constraints to Maize Production in the Humid Forest Zone of Cameroon

Ten farmers were randomly selected within the humid forest zone of Cameroon to make the most focus group of fifty people. a complete of 178 farmers were individually interviewed. A Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) was conducted in fives villages within the Bimodal Humid forest zone (BHFZ) of Cameroon in 2013. The objectives of the study were to elucidate farmer’s perceptions on maize cultivars and to spot farmer’s constraints on their maize production system. Quantitative data analyses were performed using least square means of the Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS) version 17. Results showed that poor soil fertility was among the main six problems listed by farmers within the BHFZ. Maize was the most cereal produced as food and crop within the study area. the most land management practice was slash and burn with a fallow system. the main constraints facing farmers were inadequacy of improved varieties, post-harvest handling challenges, weeds infestation, poor soil fertility and high cost of fertilizers. [5]

Reference

[1] Jones, P.G. and Thornton, P.K., 2003. The potential impacts of climate change on maize production in Africa and Latin America in 2055. Global environmental change, 13(1), (Web Link)

[2] Kang, S., Liang, Z., Pan, Y., Shi, P. and Zhang, J., 2000. Alternate furrow irrigation for maize production in an arid area. Agricultural water management, 45(3), (Web Link)

[3] Meng, Q., Hou, P., Wu, L., Chen, X., Cui, Z. and Zhang, F., 2013. Understanding production potentials and yield gaps in intensive maize production in China. Field crops research, 143, (Web Link)

[4] Global alterations in areas of suitability for maize production from climate change and using a mechanistic species distribution model (CLIMEX)
Nadiezhda Y. Z. Ramirez-Cabral, Lalit Kumar & Farzin Shabani
Scientific Reports volume 7, (Web Link)

[5] Ngonkeu, E. L. M., Tandzi, L. N., Dickmi, C. V., Nartey, E., Yeboah, M., Ngeve, J., Mafouasson, H. A., Kosgei, A., Woin, N. and Gracen, V. (2017) “Identification of Farmer’s Constraints to Maize Production in the Humid Forest Zone of Cameroon”, Journal of Experimental Agriculture International, 15(3),  (Web Link)

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