Latest Research on Blood Pressure: Jan – 2020

Report of the National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

This report updates the 1990 “National High vital sign Education Program working party Report on High vital sign in Pregnancy” and focuses on classification, pathophysiologic features, and management of the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Through a mixture of evidence-based medicine and consensus this report updates contemporary approaches to hypertension control during pregnancy by expanding on recommendations made in “The Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High vital sign .” The recommendations to use Korotkoff phase V for determination of blood pressure and to eliminate edema as a criterion for diagnosing preeclampsia are discussed. additionally , the utilization as a diagnostic criterion of vital sign increases of 30 torr systolic or 15 torr diastolic with vital sign [1]

Effects of different regimens to lower blood pressure on major cardiovascular events in older and younger adults: meta-analysis of randomised trials

Objective To quantify the relative risk reductions achieved with different regimens to lower vital sign in younger and older adults.

Design Meta-analyses and meta-regression analyses wont to compare the consequences on the first outcome between two age groups (0.09). The meta-regressions also showed no difference in effects between the 2 age groups for the result of major cardiovascular events. [2]

Effects of Different Blood Pressure–Lowering Regimens on Major Cardiovascular Events in Individuals With and Without Diabetes Mellitus Results of Prospectively Designed Overviews of Randomized Trials

Background: vital sign (BP) level may be a major determinant of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in individuals with DM . Several guidelines recommend lower BP goals and specific drug classes for these patients. The overviews reported herein were performed to formally compare the consequences on cardiovascular events and death of various BP-lowering regimens in individuals with and without diabetes.

Methods: Twenty-seven randomized trials (N = 158 709 participants) that included 33 395 individuals with diabetes and 125 314 without diabetes contributed to those analyses. for every outcome and every comparison summary, estimates of effect and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for patients with and without diabetes employing a random-effects model. The constancy of the consequences of every treatment regimen in participants with and without diabetes was examined using χ2 tests of homogeneity. [3]

Increased blood pressure variability during the subacute phase of ischemic stroke is associated with poor functional outcomes at 3 months

Thus far, it’s documented that increased vital sign variability may exacerbate stroke outcomes. vital sign within the acute phase would be influenced by both reactive hypertension to stroke and intrinsic vital sign reactivity. Thus, we aimed to guage the association between vital sign variability and outcomes at 3 months using ambulatory vital sign monitoring in ischaemic stroke patients within the subacute phase after reactive hypertension subsided. We retrospectively examined 626 consecutive patients with acute ischaemic stroke who underwent 24-hour ambulatory vital sign monitoring during the subacute phase of stroke (median, 9 days from onset). [4]

Mean Arterial Pressure Classification: A Better Tool for Statistical Interpretation of Blood Pressure Related Risk Covariates

Purpose: Both Systolic vital sign (SBP) and diastolic vital sign (DBP) are equally important to research the associations between vital sign and its associated risk covariates. Quantitative analyses however, sometime provide separate results for SBP and DBP. it’s more evident in people with systolic or diastolic hypertension. It sometime becomes difficult to interpret while performing statistical analyses. Mean blood pressure (MAP) which may be a time-weighted average of the blood pressure over the entire cycle may be a very useful gizmo for biological and life science. But, till date to the simplest of our knowledge, no classifications available like blood pressures. So, during this paper a classification of MAP was formulated following the vital sign classification as recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) and European Society of Hypertension and European Society of Cardiology (ESH/ESC). The resultant value of MAP was then classified into several categories like, optimal, normal, high normal then on. this article is therefore, an effort to postulate the MAP classification as innovative method for better statistical analyses, screening and analyses in association studies associated with blood pressures. [5]

Reference

[1] Program, N.H.B.P.E., 2000. Report of the national high blood pressure education program working group on high blood pressure in pregnancy. American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, 183(1), (Web Link)

[2] Trialists’Collaboration, B.P.L.T., 2008. Effects of different regimens to lower blood pressure on major cardiovascular events in older and younger adults: meta-analysis of randomised trials. Bmj, 336(7653), (Web Link)

[3] Trialists’Collaboration, B.P.L.T., 2005. Effects of different blood pressure-lowering regimens on major cardiovascular events in individuals with and without diabetes mellitus: results of prospectively designed overviews of randomized trials. Arch Intern Med, 165(12), (Web Link)

[4] Increased blood pressure variability during the subacute phase of ischemic stroke is associated with poor functional outcomes at 3 months
Hiroyuki Naito, Naohisa Hosomi, Daisuke Kuzume, Tomohisa Nezu, Shiro Aoki, Yuko Morimoto, Masato Kinboshi, Takeshi Yoshida, Yuji Shiga, Naoto Kinoshita, Hiroki Ueno, Kensuke Noma, Masahiro Yamasaki & Hirofumi Maruyama
Scientific Reports volume 10, (Web Link)

[5] Nath Kundu, R., Biswas, S. and Das, M. (2017) “Mean Arterial Pressure Classification: A Better Tool for Statistical Interpretation of Blood Pressure Related Risk Covariates”, Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal, 6(1), (Web Link)

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