Latest Research News on Soil Bacteria: Dec – 2019

High diversity in DNA of soil bacteria.

Soil bacterium DNA was isolated by minor modifications of previously described methods. After purification on hydroxyapatite and precipitation with cetylpyridinium bromide, the DNA was sheared during a French press to offer fragments with a mean molecular mass of 420,000 daltons. After repeated hydroxyapatite purification and precipitation with cetylpyridinium bromide, high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed the presence of two.1% RNA or less, whereas 5-methylcytosine made up 2.9% of the entire deoxycytidine content. No other unusual bases might be detected. The hyperchromicity was 31 to 36%, and therefore the melting curve in 1 X SSC (0.15 M NaCl plus 0.015 M sodium citrate) corresponded to 58.3 mol% G+C. [1]

Using soil bacteria to facilitate phytoremediation

In the past twenty years approximately, researchers have endeavored to utilize plants to facilitate the removal of both organic and inorganic contaminants from the environment, especially from soil. These phytoremediation approaches have come an extended way during a short time. However, the bulk of this work has been done under more controlled laboratory conditions and not within the field. As an adjunct to varied phytoremediation strategies and as a part of an attempt to form this technology more efficacious, variety of scientists have begun to explore the likelihood of using various soil bacteria along side plants. These bacteria include biodegradative bacteria, plant growth-promoting bacteria and bacteria that facilitate phytoremediation by other means. [2]

TOWARD AN ECOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION OF SOIL BACTERIA

Although researchers have begun cataloging the incredible diversity of bacteria found in soil, we are largely unable to interpret this information in an ecological context, including which groups of bacteria are most abundant in several soils and why. With this study, we examined how the abundances of major soil bacterial phyla correspond to the biotic and abiotic characteristics of the soil environment to work out if they will be divided into ecologically meaningful categories. to try to to this, we collected 71 unique soil samples from a good range of ecosystems across North America and searched for relationships between soil properties and therefore the relative abundances of six dominant bacterial phyla (Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, α‐Proteobacteria, and therefore the β‐Proteobacteria). Of the soil properties measured, net carbon (C) mineralization rate (an index of C availability) was the simplest predictor of phylum‐level abundances. [3]

Land use change effects on diversity of soil bacterial, Acidobacterial and fungal communities in wetlands of the Sanjiang Plain, northeastern China

The bacterial, acidobacterial, and fungal communities in wetlands can undergo perturbations by various human activities, like disturbances caused by cultivation and through the method of system restoration. during this study, we investigated the relationships between the composition of the soil bacterial, acidobacterial, and fungal communities and therefore the transformation of wetlands by human activities within the Sanjiang Plain. Soil microbial communities were assessed in wetland soils collected from pristine marsh, neighboring cropland (wetland became arable land), and land that had been reforested with Larix gmelinii. [4]

Antagonistic Potential of Soil Bacteria against Plant Pathogenic Fungi: Aspergillus niger

Aims: This study was administered with the aim of assessing the antagonistic potentials of soil bacteria against the plant pathogenic fungi Aspergillus niger.

Study Design: the entire Randomized Design was the experimental design for this study.

Place and duration of study:  This study happened in University of Calabar, Cross River State Nigeria within the pace of 1 month.

Methodology: Standard microbiological methods were wont to identify bacteria and acquire pure culture of fungi. [5]

Reference

[1] Torsvik, V., Goksøyr, J. and Daae, F.L., 1990. High diversity in DNA of soil bacteria. Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 56(3), (Web Link)

[2] Glick, B.R., 2010. Using soil bacteria to facilitate phytoremediation. Biotechnology advances, 28(3), (Web Link)

[3] Fierer, N., Bradford, M.A. and Jackson, R.B., 2007. Toward an ecological classification of soil bacteria. Ecology, 88(6), (Web Link)

[4] Land use change effects on diversity of soil bacterial, Acidobacterial and fungal communities in wetlands of the Sanjiang Plain, northeastern China
Xin Sui, Rongtao Zhang, Beat Frey, Libin Yang, Mai-He Li & Hongwei Ni
Scientific Reports volume 9, (Web Link)

[5] Rao, A. P. and Nnaji, P. T. (2017) “Antagonistic Potential of Soil Bacteria against Plant Pathogenic Fungi: Aspergillus niger”, Microbiology Research Journal International, 19(5), (Web Link)

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