Latest News on Lactobacillus Research: Dec – 2019

The genus Lactobacillus

Lactobacilli are Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, rods or coccobacilli with a G+C content of DNA usually below 50 mol%. they’re strictly fermentative, aero-tolerant or anaerobic, aciduric or acidophilic and have complex nutritional requirements (e.g. for carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, carboxylic acid esters, salts, macromolecule derivatives, and vitamins). they are doing not synthesize porphyrinoids and thus, are barren of heme-dependent activities. Strains of some species can use porphorinoids from the environment and exhibit activities of catalase, nitrite reduction or maybe cytochromes (Meisel, 1991). Pseudo-catalase is made in strains of Lb. [1]

Differentiation of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus by polymerase chain reaction

Lactobacillus casei, Lact. paracasei and Lact. rhamnosus form a closely related taxonomic category within the heterofermentative lactobacilli. These three species are difficult to differentiate using traditional fermentation profiles. we’ve developed polymerase chain reaction primers which are specific for every of those species supported differences within the V1 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Sixty‐three Lactobacillus isolates from cheese were identified using these primers. The 12 Lact. rhamnosus and 51 Lact. paracasei identified during this way were also differentiated employing a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primer. [2]

Assimilation of cholesterol by Lactobacillus acidophilus.

Considerable variation was found among strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus isolated from the fecal flora of pigs with reference to the power to grow well within the presence of bile and to assimilate cholesterol from a laboratory growth medium. The uptake of cholesterol occurred only the culture(s) was growing within the presence of bile under anaerobic conditions. Consumption of L. acidophilus RP32, which was selected for its ability to grow well within the presence of bile and to assimilate cholesterol from the laboratory medium, significantly inhibited increases in serum cholesterol levels of pigs (P but 0.05) fed a high-cholesterol diet. [3]

Antimicrobial and inflammatory properties of South African clinical Lactobacillus isolates and vaginal probiotics

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) causes genital inflammation and increased HIV acquisition risk. The standard-of-care for BV, antibiotic therapy, is related to high recurrence rates. Probiotics may improve treatment outcomes, although substantial heterogeneity in efficacy has been observed during clinical trials. to guage the potential to enhance existing probiotics, we compared the inflammatory and antimicrobial (adhesion, H2O2, D-lactate and L-lactate production) characteristics of 23 vaginal Lactobacillus isolates from South African women, commercial vaginal probiotics (L. casei rhamnosus, L. acidophilus) and 4 reference strains. [4]

Lipolytic Lactobacillus Species from Camel Milk

Over the past few years, carboxylic acid bacteria (LAB) have received extensive consideration as probiotics. Probiotics concepts have gained such a lot of recognition and extend from traditional dairy products to a profitable market of probiotic health supplements and functional foods. Probiotics are known for his or her health benefits also as their human friendly nature. Probiotic carboxylic acid bacteria with lipolytic activity are often helpful for people’s affected by high serum lipid level. Consumption of such products contained lipolytic probiotic carboxylic acid bacteria can help to scale back the occurrence of consequences related to high serum level. within the present work, two bacterial isolates were purified from camel milk. [5]

Reference

[1] Hammes, W.P. and Vogel, R.F., 1995. The genus lactobacillus. In The genera of lactic acid bacteria (pp. 19-54). Springer, Boston, MA. (Web Link)

[2] Ward, L.J.H. and Timmins, M.J., 1999. Differentiation of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus by polymerase chain reaction. Letters in applied microbiology, 29(2), (Web Link)

[3] Gilliland, S.E., Nelson, C.R. and Maxwell, C., 1985. Assimilation of cholesterol by Lactobacillus acidophilus. Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 49(2), (Web Link)

[4] Antimicrobial and inflammatory properties of South African clinical Lactobacillus isolates and vaginal probiotics
Emily Chetwin, Monalisa T. Manhanzva, Andrea G. Abrahams, Remy Froissart, Hoyam Gamieldien, Heather Jaspan, Shameem Z. Jaumdally, Shaun L. Barnabas, Smritee Dabee, Anna-Ursula Happel, Desiree Bowers, Lester Davids, Jo-Ann S. Passmore & Lindi Masson
Scientific Reports volume 9, (Web Link)

[5] Rathore, M. and Sharma, K. (2017) “Lipolytic Lactobacillus Species from Camel Milk”, Microbiology Research Journal International, 22(1), (Web Link)

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